Rob Fetters

Please go to the contact page and send me an email if you want me to play in your house. 

Artist ( loosely applied ) Statement 

 A – A few observations gleaned from performing music in the last 40+ years:

 1) Many venues I've played have had questionable acoustics; I'm not always convinced the audience is accurately hearing what I'm doing. (Maybe they can't see what I'm doing, either.)

2) Since I usually play gigs with other songwriters, I rarely "go deep" into my catalog. Some of my best stuff has only been performed live a handful times - or not at all. 

3) I truly love playing in bands for crowds – but – memorable music magic often happens in more intimate spaces. ie: songs are written in bedrooms and kitchens, recorded in studios….

 B – Therefore: 

 1) Although doing a solo house concert has a certain terrifying aspect – there'll be no place to hide when I screw up – it’s the right thing to do in 2018. More precisely: if I don't do it now I know I'll regret it; I can still sing and play my ass off, but I’ve been told (gulp) nothing lasts forever.

2) I'm throwing everything into a one man career-spanning show – performing material I wrote for The Raisins, The Bears, psychodots, my solo albums, and debuting a new tune or three.

3) I'm overbuilding the show; doing stripped down acoustic guitar / vocal renditions but also rocking out on ye olde stratocaster by bringing at least 10 studio tracks into the mix. I bought a fantastic-sounding Bose system so you'll hear what I hear. My son Sam describes the concert as a "performance + guitar + recording workshop + story telling hour". Except that it'll run over two hours. We’ll have a break to freshen your drinks and so on.

 C – My first house concert went fantastically magically smashingly: next day the hosts asked me to do 2 more in the coming year:

 1) House concert adepts have already done pioneering work: we're copying the "industry standard" for now. It’s pretty simple and a lot of fun.

2) Audience members are first invited by the host via email, then confirmed. This way, the hostess can feel good / safe about whoever is coming to her home. Seems like 25 guests minimum, 50 maximum works well.

3) The ticket cost is $20; guests plop it into a box upon arrival. Proceeds go to the musician with the curly white hair. Plenty of cool merch will be available. A ticket service or PayPal can also be used, but the casual box collection works well.

4) BYOB. Water / soda / ice / cups / glasses are usually provided. It’s not required but guests often bring munchies to share.

5) No iron rule but I think leaving recording devices off sometimes makes for better immersion in the show. I only ask that recordings be shared privately.  

7) I can't wait to play! Most of the musicians who do this sort of thing are young hopefuls waiting to crack the big time. But me? I've seen the light: small is the new big. Small is beautiful.